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A Broader Definition of Philanthropy by Women

Current fundraising practices often only focus on the treasure – what is a donor’s capacity to give? When we expand the definition of philanthropy beyond Treasure to also include Time, Talent, Ties, and Testimony, we increase our number of supporters and leaders, especially women.

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Chronicle of Philanthropy: How a DE&I Audit Can Help Organizations Move from Awareness to Action

Organizations often overestimate how included those they serve and employ really feel in the mission. A diversity audit can help bring those true feelings to light, says Dr. Angelique Grant at the Aspen Leadership Group. Grant leads these audits and says it’s essential that nonprofits focus on equity and inclusion — not just diversity. “If you have an organization [where] no one feels included or a sense of belonging or wanting to be there, it doesn’t matter how diverse you are,” she said. “Once you’ve identified whatever the obstacles are, it sets you up for moving from awareness to action.” Read more about how grantmakers and nonprofits can be accountable and transparent with their DE&I efforts in The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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From Commitment to Action: Applying an Inclusive Lens to Advancement

More fundraising leaders are embracing inclusion and want to train their teams on diversity, equity and inclusion. But are we adapting our actions by applying a DE&I lens to our advancement practices? Williams College and William & Mary demonstrated success when they adopted inclusive fundraising strategies. Now the philanthropy sector must develop new skills and change behaviors to achieve similar long-term results.

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Women’s Philanthropy: A Sector-Wide Journey to Inclusion

The movement to grow women’s philanthropy is not meant to focus only on one profile of women who give. Women’s philanthropy includes ALL those who identify as women. It is intended to be inclusive. Yet current language and actions by those who identify as white cisgender women leaders in this movement – including myself – may not be making inclusivity clear. We unconsciously may be perpetuating a system of racism and gender inequity.

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Featured in Inside Philanthropy: “Build a Larger Toolbox.” A Veteran Higher Ed Fundraiser on the Field’s Virtual Future

Don Hasseltine speaks with Inside Philanthropy about two questions on his mind: How will COVID-19 change the day-to-day mechanics of higher ed fundraising, and how can professionals prepare for these changes? “He predicts that online connection will play a significant role in fundraising for a long time to come—and those who embrace it stand to make their donor bases even stronger than they were before the pandemic.” Read the full story.

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All Voices at the Table

It is on us to create diverse women’s philanthropy councils. Now. Women of color are the most underrepresented of all groups on boards. Women of color and women of different generations have voices and perspectives to add regarding how they give and want to be engaged. By including men on our councils, they can leverage their platforms and share their power, making them valuable contributors and allies to grow women’s philanthropy. Wider diversity will help our councils make better decisions and grow philanthropy. This takes attention, intention, asking stakeholders for help, and adapting your model when needed, to be successful.

No, We Are Not Okay

If you are a leader in an organization committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, now is not the time to remain silent. Now is the time to show your colleagues of color that you value them and support them, and that you are committed to playing a leadership role in your organization’s anti-racist work.

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Managing Talent Through Tough Times

After rapidly and successfully adjusting to remote operations, talent managers are now looking ahead to what the advancement team of the future looks like. The following offers insights from talent managers at a variety of organizations for how they are weathering the storm. It offers key considerations for planning, recommendations for best practices, and innovative examples from colleges and universities that respond to our teams’ physical, mental, and emotional needs as we transition to new models. The inspiration of this article was the result of a national advancement talent management leaders convening that was co-facilitated by Yvette Marsh, Executive Director of Talent Management, Louisiana State University Foundation and Angelique Grant, Senior Consultant and Vice President at Aspen Leadership Group.

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